How to configure the Search Results Web Part in Sharepoint [Solved]

How to configure the Search Results Web Part in Sharepoint

If you don’t want to check pages in and out when you configure the Search Results Web Part, you can turn SharePoint Logooff versioning for the Pages library.

To turn off versioning for the Pages library:

  1. Go to Site settings –> Site contents.
  2. On the Site Contents page, click the Pages library.
  3. In the Pages library, click the LIBRARY tab and then Library Settings.
  4. On the Settings page, click Versioning settings.
  5. On the Versioning Settings page, in the Content Approval section, for Require content approval for submitted items, select No.
  6. In the Document Version History section, for Create a version each time you edit a file in this document library, select No versioning.
  7. In the Require Check Out section, for Require documents to be checked out before they can be edited, select No.

Turn off versioning for the Pages library

 

Why you should consider creating a result source for your Search Center
A result source specifies where your search results can come from.

For example, in my scenario, I did not want search results to come from all sites within the SharePoint farm. I only wanted search results from one specific site within the farm.

The default result source in a Search Center returns search results from the entire SharePoint farm. If you want search results from the entire SharePoint farm, you can skip to the next blog post in this series.  However, if you want search results from only a sub set within your SharePoint farm (in my scenario, one specific site), you should create a result source.

 

How to create a result source
Depending on your permission level, you create a result source on three levels:

Permission level Where the result source will be added
Search service application administrator To all site collections within the farm
Site collection administrator To all sites within a site collection
Site collection owner To a single site

To save space, I will only show you how to create a result source as a Site collection administrator.

  1. Go to Site settings –> Search Result Sources.
  2. On the Manage Result Sources page, click New Result Source.

New result source

  1. On the Add Result Source page, enter a Name. Select values for Protocol and Type, and click Launch Query Builder. This will open a dialog box.In my scenario, I named the result source Articles, and kept the default values for Protocol and Type.

Specify new result source

  1. In the Build Your Query dialog box, define the result source.Remember, in my scenario, I only wanted search results to come from a particular site within the farm, so in the Query text field, I added the following:
    {searchTerms?} (contentclass:sts_listitem) path:http://<path>

Specify query for new result source

Now, before we move on, let me break down what I entered:

  • {searchTerms?} In my result source, I wanted to include the words that users type in the query box whey then search for something. Obviously I have no way of knowing what users will type, so I added the query variable {searchTerms?} By the way, you can tell it’s a query variable because it’s enclosed in curly brackets.  When users enter a query, this query variable will be replaced by the words the users have typed in the query box. The question mark at the end of the variable means that if no words have been entered, the variable should be ignored.
  • (contentclass:sts_listitem)  This means that only list items will be included in my result source.
  • path:http://<path>   This is the path to the site from where I wanted search results to come from.
  1. Test that the result source is working correctly by clicking on the TEST tab, and then Show more.

Test result source

  1. In the {searchTerms} field enter Query words to simulate a query entered by a user, and then click Test query.In my scenario, I entered search configuration.

Test specific query for result source

Notice that 52 results were returned (I will tell you why this is kind of cool in the next section…).

  1. Click OK to close the dialog box, and then Save.

So now that we have a result source for the Search Center, we can move on to configuring the Search Results Web Part to use the new result source.

 

How to configure the Search Results Web Part to use a new result source
By default, the Search Results Web Part is used on the search results page. In order to configure the Search Result Web Part, you have to navigate to the search results page.

  1. On your Search Center home page (the default URL to this page is <site>/Pages/default.aspx), enter a query in the search box, and press Enter.In my scenario, I entered search configuration.

Enter query on search page

When you press Enter, you will be taken to the to the search results page (the default URL to this page is <site>/Pages/results.aspx).

In my scenario, 1,051 search results were returned.

Default search results showing 1,051 results

Remember, by default you’ll get search results from the entire SharePoint farm. To change this so that only search results from your newly created result source are returned, here’s what you should do:

  1. On the search results page, click the Settings menu –> Edit Page.
  2. In the Search Results Web Part, click the Web Part Menu, and then Edit Web Part.

Edit Web Part

  1. In the Web Part tool pane, click Change query. This will open a dialog box.

Change query in Web Part tool pane

  1. In the dialog box, from the Select a query menu, select your newly created result source.In my scenario, I selected the Articles (Site Collection) result source.

Select new result source

  1. Click OK in the dialog box, OK in the Web Part Tool pane, and then save the page. To verify that the configuration is working, enter a query.In my scenario, I entered search configuration.

Final search results with new result source

52 results were returned, which is the same number of items that was returned when I tested the query in the result source configuration. Cool, don’t you think?

Credit: http://blogs.technet.com/b/tothesharepoint/archive/2013/11/06/how-to-configure-the-search-results-web-part-to-use-a-new-result-source-in-sharepoint-2013.aspx

How to Implement Record Management in Sharepoint

How to Implement Record Management in Sharepoint

SharePoint LogoYou can manage records “in place,” which means that you can leave a document in its current location on a site, or store records in a specific archive, such as a Records Center site.

Before you implement records management, it is recommended that you first create a records management plan for your organization. To help you choose the right records management system for your organization, see Choose how to store and manage records.

Create and configure a Records Center site

This section provides an overview on the major steps you need to take to create and configure a Records Center site. Click the links to see specific guidance on each step.

  1. Create the Records Center site using the Records Center site template.
  2. Create record libraries or lists to manage and store each record type that is specified in your file plan (def: A file plan describes the types of documents or items that an organization acknowledges as official business records. It indicates where these records are stored, and it provides information that differentiates one type of record from another).
  3. Add an associated content type to your libraries and lists.
  4. Create and add site columns to the relevant content types to contain and display the metadata for each record type that is specified in your file plan.
  5. Add an information management policy to a content type on the Records Center site.
  6. Configure the Content Organizer to route each record type to the appropriate location.

Credit: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/office365-sharepoint-online-enterprise-help/implement-records-management-HA102893868.aspx

How to Apply Sharepoint Permissions [Solved]

How to Apply Sharepoint Permissions

SharePoint LogoUsers within SharePoint are granted permissions to objects such as Sites, Lists, Folders and List Items. The permission that the user receives can be granted in many ways such as directly against the user account, against a SharePoint Group that the user happens to be a member of, or by Active Directory Group. Active Directory Groups can also be nested within a SharePoint group. There are many circumstances that can affect a user’s permissions to a particular object which may not be obvious to you when trying to establish what permissions a user really has.

There are many different permissions that people can receive to a particular object. These permissions are split into three categories:

  • · Site
  • · List
  • · Personal

The Site permissions effect what you can do with the Site itself and include permissions such as: Manage Web Site, Apply Themes and Borders, and Create Subsites. List permissions effect what you can do with a list and include that of: Add Items, Edit Items, and Delete Items. Personal permissions control the ability to create personal views, Add personal web parts, or update personal web parts.

In total there are around 12 List Permissions, 18 Site Permissions and 3 Personal Permissions. To make your life easier, permission levels exist that already contain many of these permissions. For example, the Contribute Permission Level includes the ability to Add items and Edit Items amongst many others. Therefore you do not usually have to be concerned with granting individual permissions to each SharePoint user. Permission Levels that exist Out-of-the-Box include:

  • · Full Control
  • · Design
  • · Contribute
  • · Read
  • · Limited Access
  • · View Only
  • · Approve
  • · Manage Hierarchy
  • · Restricted Read

Note: These permissions levels are explained in detail later on within this whitepaper.

As well as the Out-of-the-Box permissions levels, you will find that you can also create your own custom permission levels. For example, you may want a permission level somewhere between Read and Contribute that perhaps doesn’t offer permissions such as Delete Items or Manage Personal Views.

You can probably imagine how difficult it would be to keep track of hundreds of individuals who are granted different permission levels. Therefore there is a more logical way to organize users into groups, and then assign the permissions to the groups instead of against a user directly. Your organization may make use of Active Directory Groups that already exist, as well as making use of SharePoint Groups.

To summarize, the below diagram details how permissions may be granted to users within your SharePoint Sites. Permissions may be assigned to Users or Domain Groups via a SharePoint Group or they can be assigned a permission level directly.

 

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Figure 1 – The diagram shows how permissions are assigned to users either directly or via SharePoint Groups.

Throughout your Site Collection, each object will have an Access Control List (ACL). The ACL contains the assignment of Permissions to each account for the object. When a new object such as a sub site, list, folder or list item is created, its ACL is inherited from the parent object. Therefore, a user who has contribute permissions to a site, will be granted permissions to each list, folder and list item within the site unless permissions inheritance is broken. The below diagram shows how permissions are inherited and where permission inheritance may be broken.

 

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Figure 2 – An example Site Collection showing how objects within a site collection can have broken or inherited permissions

Throughout this whitepaper, you will learn how to create and manage SharePoint Groups as well as Permission Levels, Manage Permission Inheritance and understand the permission reports.

SharePoint Groups

SharePoint Groups act as a method of containing a number of users or domain groups as a single entity. As a single entity, permissions can be assigned to the group against objects such as Team Sites, Libraries, Lists and List Items. Assigning permissions to a single entity rather than multiple user accounts or domain groups makes management of permissions easier. Users can be added or removed from the group(s) which will immediately affect the permission that they were granted.

During the provisioning of a new Team Site, you will be able to click the ‘More Options’ button and choose whether permissions are inherited or not from the parent site. If you select the radio button to allow unique permissions, you will have the opportunity to create up-to three new SharePoint groups which will be scoped at the newly provisioned site. If you select to inherit permissions, you will inherit the groups from the parent site.

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Figure 3 – Permission inheritance options when creating a new team site

Three groups can be created:

  1. 1. Owners of this Site
  2. 2. Members of this Site
  3. 3. Visitors to this Site

The owners group is granted Full Control permissions by default, the Members group will be assigned Contribute Permissions and the Visitors Group should you opt to create it will be assigned Read permissions. By default, the account that you are signed in as will become a member of the Owners and Members groups. However, at this stage you have the ability to change the memberships of these groups.

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Figure 4 – Default SharePoint Groups.

Within the next section, we will explore the default SharePoint Groups and how you manage the memberships of them.

Default Groups

There are three default groups when you first create a sub site (sub web) from a parent site if you have opted for unique permissions. Each group by default is named with a the Team Site name as the prefix followed by Owners, Members and Visitors. As described above, the Owners site is granted Full Control, Members is assigned Contributors and Visitors is assigned Read permissions. You can change the permission level that these groups are assigned, but that will get confusing the larger your environment gets.

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Figure 5 – Default SharePoint Groups.

There is a More… link on the same People and Groups – Permission Members page that will show other groups defined within the current site collection. By clicking that more link you will be presented with the other groups and for some will also be able to see at which site they are scoped at. This screen is often confusing as it is not clear which of these groups will only affect this particular site. By changing other groups members, you will be changing the members permissions not just to this site but to other objects as well.

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Figure 6 – Site Collection Groups list

Custom Groups

SharePoint Groups are often better understood if they are named after a role. This way you can apply better business logic when assigning permissions to SharePoint objects. E.g. within a Team Site provisioned for managing a Customer, you may have Sales Executives, Sales Managers, and Accounts. Each of these groups may be assigned a different permission to the team site itself and the objects within the team site. Although typically you would have such groups defined within your Active Directory, it is sometimes the case that you want smaller sets of users within your groups who perhaps work at a particular location or division of the organization.

When you create a new group, you can provide a name and description. Providing a detailed description is advisable so that users know exactly what the purpose of that group is. The Group Owner can manage the members of the group. This is quite a powerful feature as you as a Site Owner can create a group allowing another member to manage it. E.g. It may make more sense for a Sales Manager to manage the Sales Executives group that it would for the IT Department. It is important to note that you can only add one person as the group owner. In some circumstances, it would make sense to add a Active Directory group as the owner rather than an individual. That way the group can be managed by multiple Sales Managers. Plus if the only Owner leaves the organization, you cannot change the membership easily.

You can also control who can view the group membership. Group Members is the default, but it can be changed to Everyone.

Editing the group members can also be done via other group members if you set Group Members radio button in the ‘Who can edit the membership of the group?’ section.

Depending on the type of group, you may want to enable users to request to join a group in which case the Group Owner can approve the request. You can also allow people to subscribe themselves by allowing Auto-accept requests. You can specify which email address the requests should go to within the properties of the new group.

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Figure 7 – Creating a new custom group

Finally, you can set what permissions the group will have to this site. Note that you are controlling the permissions to just this site, and that the group can be used against other objects and therefore be assigned other permissions to those other objects.

Managing Groups

To add new users to your group, choose Site Settings, from the Site Actions menu and the People and Groups. You can then click New, Add Users to add a new user to the group.

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Figure 8 – Adding a user or domain group to a SharePoint group

Enter the name of the user that you wish to add, and then click onto the Check Names button or press CTRL+K.

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Figure 9 – Adding a user to a group.

Removing a user from a group is also quite simple. You can check the check box against the user that you wish to remove, and then choose Actions, Remove Users from Group.

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Figure 10 – Removing a user from a Group.

SharePoint Permission Levels

SharePoint Groups or accounts such as a domain user or domain group can be assigned permissions to a SharePoint object such as a Site, List, Library, Folder or List Item. Permission Levels such as Contribute and Read are made up of individual permissions. Within this section we will explore the Out-of-the-Box permissions levels before exploring how we can create custom permission levels.

Out-of-the-Box Permission Levels

To access the Out-of-the-Box permissions, choose Site Actions, Site Permissions. You will be able to see a list of users/groups that have permission to your team site. Within the Permission Tools ribbon, click Permission Levels to see the existing permission levels.

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Figure 11 – Accessing Permission Levels

The Out-of-the-Box permission levels include:

Full Control User will receive every SharePoint Permission unless the permission has been removed via a Permission Policy. The permission level cannot be modified.
Design Users with Design Permissions can virtually do everything with the exception of Manage Permissions on the Site, View Web Analytics Data, Create Subsites, Manage Web Site, Create Groups, Enumerate Permissions and Manage Alerts. Users with this permission level can create, edit and delete list items as well as make design changes to the Shared views of the site and lists.
Contribute Contributers can create, edit, and delete items within lists and libraries. They have the same restrictions as Design plus they cannot manage the look and feel of sites or shared views. They cannot apply themes, styles, or modify pages.
Read Readers have the same restrictions as Contributers. In addition they cannot Create, Edit or Delete Items. They can only open items to read them. They also do not get any personal permissions and therefore cannot add or remove personal web parts, manage personal views or edit personal user information.
Limited Access Limited Access provides you enough permissions to navigate to an item that you do have permission to. For example, you may have been granted Read permissions to a Document within a library that had broken permission inheritance. If you did not have permissions granted to you for the site or library that contained the document, you would be granted limited access which allows you to navigate to the document without seeing any other content. Limited Access is often incorrectly reported in the permission reports. E.g. A user may have Full Control to a Site via a Domain Group. They are also granted permissions directly to a document. The user would then be listed as having Limited Access instead of Full Control to the Team Site.
View Only The same as read but cannot download documents. Can only view them in the browser.
Approve Very similar to contribute but also has Approve Items permission.
Manage Hierarchy Virtually the same as Full Control but does not have Design change options such as apply theme. Used by users who are likely to move sites around.
Restricted Read Can view pages and documents, but cannot view historical versions or user permissions.
Creating Custom Permission Levels

You can change the existing permission levels or create your own permission levels at the root site level in the site collection only. In SharePoint 2007, this could be done at sub site level. It is possible to break permission level inheritance but only through the Object Model but that is beyond the scope of this article. You will find a good explanation here: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/7038444/programatically-break-permission-level-inheritance

Note: I would recommend never changing the existing permission levels as that would be very confusing to users who expect a permission level to behave within a certain way.

The reason for creating a custom permission level will be specific to your needs. It might be that you want for example a permission level that lies somewhere between Read and Contribute. Perhaps you want users to be able to Add and Edit items but not Delete.

You can create a custom permission level in two ways. Firstly, you can create them from scratch and select each permission that you would like the permission level to have. Or you can copy an existing permission level, provide it a new name, and then apply the changes to the new copy.

To create a new permission level from scratch:

  1. 1. Ensure that you are a Site Owner with the Manage Permissions role.
  2. 2. Click Site Actions, Site Permissions.
  3. 3. Click the Permission Levels button
  4. 4. Click the Add a Permission Level action button.
  5. 5. Provide a Name and Description for your custom permission level.
  6. 6. Check the Site, List, and Personal permissions that you wish to grant to the permission level.
  7. 7. Click Create.

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Figure 12 – Creating a custom permission level from scratch.

To create a custom permission level by copying an existing permission level:

  1. 1. Ensure that you are a Site Owner with the Manage Permissions role.
  2. 2. Click Site Actions, Site Permissions.
  3. 3. Click the Permission Levels button
  4. 4. Click on an existing permission level such as Contribute.
  5. 5. Scroll to the bottom of the page.
  6. 6. Click the Copy Permission Level button.

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Figure 13 – Copying a Permission Level.

7. Provide a Name and Description for your custom permission level.

8. Make the desired changes by selecting or deselecting the permissions check boxes.

Assigning Permissions Levels

Permission Levels can be assigned to Users, Local Groups or Domain Groups as well as SharePoint Groups. There are different opinions on what you should do. However, my personal preference is to use add domain groups to SharePoint Groups in order for permissions to be granted rather than assigning domain groups permissions directly. Within your environment, you may find granting permissions directly to Active Directory users or groups works best.

To assign permissions to a SharePoint Group:

  1. 1. Choose Site Actions, Site Permissions.
  2. 2. Check the box of the group that you would like to modify.
  3. Click the Edit User Permissions button

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Figure 14 – Editing permissions for a SharePoint group

3. Check the permission level that you would like to grant to this SharePoint Group.

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Figure 15 – Assigning the custom permission level

4. Your SharePoint Group will now have permissions to the Site and anything that inherits permissions from the site such as sub webs or Lists/Libraries.

Assigning permission to Active Directory Groups or Users:

1. Click Site Actions, Site Permissions.
2. Click the Grant Permissions button on the ribbon.
3. Enter or lookup the name of the user or group that you wish to grant permissions to.
4. Select the radio button to Grant Permissions directly.
5. Check the required permission for the user or group.

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Figure 16 – Granting permissions to a user or group directly.

SharePoint Permissions

As has already been explained, permission levels are collections of permissions that can be assigned to Users/Groups or SharePoint Groups. It is important to understand not just what each permission level can do in general, but to have an understanding of each permission that can be made available to a permission level.

Permissions are organized into three different categories. We will discuss each permission’s behaviour within the below tables.

Site Permissions

Manage Permissions Can create and change permissions for users and groups and change permission levels.
View Web Analytics Data View the analytical reports available through site settings
Create Subsites Have the ability to create sub sites (webs) or workspaces such as meeting workspaces or document workspaces beneath this site.
Manage Web Site Can manage the site settings within the site
Add and Customise pages Add, Remove, Modify pages of the Site using an editor such as SharePoint Designer.
Apply Themes and Borders Apply a theme to the site
Apply Style Sheets Apply a CSS style sheet to the site
Create Groups Create new SharePoint Groups
Browse Directories Browse the files and folders through SharePoint Designer or WebDav interfaces
Use Self Service Site Creation Self Service Site Creation can be turned on or off in Central Administration and allows users to be able to create their own Site Collections
View Pages Can view the pages within the site
Enumerate Permissions Can view the permissions reports against the site/lists and libraries/items and documents
Manage Alerts Can Manage Alerts for users within the site.
Use Remote Interfaces Access the site programmatically through the object model/web services.
Use Client Integration Features Use integrations features through Microsoft Office which are launched through SharePoint. Without this permissions, users will need to upload documents.
Open Allows users to open a Web site, list, or folder in order to access items inside that container.
Edit Personal User Information Allows a user to change his or her own user information, such as adding picture.

List Permissions

Manage Lists Can create/Delete lists. Add remove columns within a list and access most settings on the List settings page
Override Check Out If someone has a document checked out, you can override the checkout although their changes will be discarded.
Add Items Can add items to a list
Edit Items Can edit items in a list including pages in a pages library
Delete Items Can delete items
View Items Can view items in lists and documents
Approve Items Can approve a minor version of a document or list item
Open Items View the source of documents
View Versions View previous versions of a list item or document
Delete Versions Can delete previous versions
Create Alerts Can create alerts
View Application Pages Can view other aspx pages such as View Forms, Views, and enumerate lists.

Personal Permissions

Manage Personal Views Sites are made up of Shared and Personal Views. With this permission you can create, edit and delete your personal views
Add/Remove Personal Web Parts You can add, configure and remove web parts on personal web part pages
Update Personal Web Parts Can set personal properties on Web Parts that affect only you.

Check Permissions

The permission reports within SharePoint 2010 can be very confusing especially when you consider that there are users who inherit permissions and also when Active Directory groups are used to assign permissions to people directly or through SharePoint Groups. Quite often for example, you will see users listed as having ‘Limited Access’ when in fact their level of permission is much higher. The reason for this is that when running a permission report, you cannot see users that have permissions via Active Directory groups. You can only see that the group itself has permission. If a user of that Active Directory Group is assigned permissions uniquely to an object such as a Library, Folder or List item, they will be granted Limited Access to the site. Limited Access is therefore what will be reported in the permission report. To verify these permissions you can use the Check Permissions option.

Take for example Dmitry below who is reported as having ‘Limited Access’

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Figure 17 – Permission report showing Limited Access for user: Dmitry

If we check the permissions for Dmitry, we will see that his permissions to the site are actually higher than what is reported:

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Figure 18 – Running Check Permissions against the user account ‘Dmitry’.

We can see clearly that Dmitry has Contribute permissions to the team site through a group called Developers. This is still difficult to work out or double check since you cannot see Dmitry is a member of the Developers domain group without checking Active Directory.

NOTE: This is a problem that is resolved using our DeliverPoint Permissions Management tool which can be seen below:

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Figure 19 – Using DeliverPoint to check Permissions you can see the correct permission reporting and enumerate Active Directory groups.

Permission Inheritance

As already mentioned at the start of this article. Almost every object in SharePoint can inherit or have unique permissions. The default when you create a new subsite is for the site to inherit permissions from the parent subsite. All of the Lists and Libraries within that site will also inherit permissions from their parent which would be the site itself. Likewise as you begin to create folders, list items and documents, they will also inherit permissions from their parent container. Nested folders will also inherit permissions from the folder that contains it. Permissions can be broken at any level. When you break the permission inheritance, a copy is made of the permissions from the parent but can now be changed. Therefore you can grant new permissions without affecting the parent. A common mistake is to think that the groups are now independent. If you add a user to a group within an object that has broken permission inheritance, the object will be affected as the new user will gain permissions to it, but the scope of the group will be defined at a higher level and therefore the user will also receive permissions to other object that have permissions granted to that group.

To break permission inheritance within a site:

1. Choose Site Settings, Site Permissions
2. Click the Stop Inheriting Permissions button on the Permission Tools ribbon.

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Figure 20 – Breaking permission inheritance at Site Level.

3. The button will toggle allowing you to re-inherit permissions.

To break permissions within a Library or List:

1. Navigate to the List or Library
2. Click List under List Tools
3. Click the List Permissions button on the ribbon
4. Click Stop inheriting Permissions.
To break permissions within a list item or folder:
1. Navigate to the list or library containing the list item or folder.
2. Hover the mouse over the Title of the list item/document or folder.
3. Click Stop Inheriting Permissions.

Credit: http://lightningtools.com/sharepoint_2010/sharepoint-2010-permissions-management-guide/

Manage users and specify permissions for a Web site using SharePoint [Solved]

Manage users and specify permissions for a Web site using SharePoint

Before you begin

SharePoint LogoTo complete this tutorial, you’ll need to be a member of the Administrator site group on a Windows SharePoint Services site. It’s best to try out these tutorials on a site that’s not being used by a team. If you don’t have a server running Windows SharePoint Services available and have Internet access, you can sign up for a hosted Windows SharePoint Services trial.

Create a practice site
  1. On the top link bar in an existing site, click Create.
  2. In the Web Pages section, click Sites and Workspaces.
  3. In the Title and Description section, type a name, such as Practice Site, and a description for the new site.
  4. In the Web Site Address section, complete the Web address (URL) that you will type to go to the new site.

 Note   The first part of the address is provided for you.

  1. In the Permissions section, click Use unique permissions.
  2. Click Create.
  3. On the Template Selection page, in the Template list, click Team Site, and then click OK.

Now that you have your practice site, you can create a practice list.

Create a practice list
  1. On the top link bar in your practice site, click Create.
  2. In the Custom Lists section, click Custom List.
  3. In the Name box, type Incentives, and then click Create.

With your practice site set up, you’re ready to manage the users and permissions on the site.

Adding users to a site

Contoso Corporation recently hired a new salesperson. This employee, Mary North, needs to be added to the site and assigned to the Contributor site group so that she can start working with the other members of the sales team.

By using the Manage Users page you can see the list of users, sort the list, add users to it, change site group membership, and delete users.

 Note   You must be a member of the Administrators site group for the site to be able to use the Manage Users page.

Manage Users

You can use either a domain user address (DOMAIN\username) or an e-mail address (such as someone@example.com) to add a user. If you are adding users from your organization’s domain, the user’s display name will be looked up and filled in automatically. If you are creating unique accounts based on e-mail addresses, you can fill in the user’s display name, or let the user update their display name later.

For this tutorial, you will be adding a fictitious user with a fictitious e-mail address. If you prefer, or if your environment requires a real user name and address, you can add a real user account from your organization.

Add a user to your site
  1. On your practice Web site, click Site Settings.
  2. On the Site Settings page, in the Administration section, click Manage users.
  3. On the Manage Users page, click Add Users.
  4. In the Step 1: Choose Users section type mary@contoso.com to add a fictitious user (Mary North).

You can also type the actual e-mail address or DOMAIN\username of a user in your organization to add a real user.

  1. In the Step 2: Choose Permissions section, select the Contributor check box, and then click Next.
  2. In the Step 3: Confirm Users section, verify the e-mail address, and if you are adding a fictitious user, type maryn as the user name and Mary North as the display name.

If you are using a real user account, verify the user name and display name for that account.

  1. In the Step 4: Send E-mail section, clear the Send the following e-mail to let these users know they’ve been added check box.

 Note   Because this is a practice exercise, you do not want to send an e-mail message to your new user.

  1. Click Finish.

 Note   If the message “The user does not exist” appears, try repeating these steps by using information for a real user in your organization.

Viewing and changing information about site users

Mary North recently changed her name to Mary Baker. You did not know about the name change when you added her account, so you must now update it so that her new name is reflected on your site.

You can see a list of all users who belong to a site from the User Information page. This list displays summary information, and you can click each user name to see details about that user.

View a list of users
  1. On your practice site, click Site Settings.
  2. Under Manage My Information, click View information about site users.

You can view a list of all users on the site.

User Information list

If you click a user name, you can see the user’s e-mail address and any notes about that user that a site administrator has added. If you are a member of the Administrators site group, you can also see whether the user is a site administrator (or owner of the site) and you can change the user’s information.

User Details

 Note   Any member of the site can see the list of users on the User Information page, and can click to view details about a user. However, only a member of the Administrator site group, or the users themselves, can change the user information.

Change a user’s name
  1. On the User Information page, click Mary North (or the user account you added).
  2. Click Edit User Information.
  3. In the Display Name box, select “North” and type “Baker” (or change the corresponding last name for the user account you created).
  4. Click Save and Close.

Assigning users to groups

Mary Baker, previously Mary North, has been assigned to help you create content for your site and make sure that the site design is fresh and interesting. She can currently add and change only items in lists and libraries, but now she needs to be able to change more of the site. You can grant her more extensive rights so that she can make the changes she needs to.

In Windows SharePoint Services, rights to a site are controlled by membership in site groups. Users must be assigned to a site group to be able to view a site, or make any changes to a site. There are five site groups by default:

  • Guest     A special group that gives guest users access to a specific list, without giving them access to the entire site. (See the following section, “Setting user permissions on a list or document library”, for more information about the Guest site group.)
  • Reader     Allows a user to view items in lists and document libraries, view pages in the site, and create a site by using Self-Service Site Creation.
  • Contributor     Allows a user to interact with Web Parts and lists and document libraries. They can also create and manage personal views and cross-site groups, and personalize Web Part Pages.
  • Web Designer     Allows a user to customize the Web site by using the HTML tools or a Web page editor compatible with Windows SharePoint Services, such as Microsoft Office FrontPage 2003. For example, members of the Web Designer site group can create lists from within the site or add pages to the site by using a Web page editor.
  • Administrator     Allows a user to have complete control over a Web site. Members of the Administrator site group can configure settings, manage users and site groups, and view usage analysis data.

When you added Mary North (now Baker) to the site, you assigned her to the Contributor site group. You can change these assignments at any time. If you want to change which site groups a user is a member of, you use the Manage Users page. You must be a member of the Administrators site group for the site to use the Manage Users page.

 Note   If you remove a user from all site groups, that user no longer has any rights on the site.

Assign a user to a different site group
  1. On the top navigation bar for your practice site, click Site Settings.
  2. On the Site Settings page, in the Administration section, click Manage Users.
  3. On the Manage Users page, select the check box next to Mary Baker (or the user you created).
  4. Click Edit Site Group of Selected Users.
  5. In the Site Group Membership area, select the check box next to Web Designer and clear the check box next to Contributor.
  6. Click OK.

Mary Baker is now a member of the Web Designers site group, and can create lists or change the site as needed.

Setting user permissions on a list or document library

Your site contains an incentives list — a list of perks that are granted to help motivate the salespeople to generate revenue. You need to secure this list so that only Mary Baker can add, change, or delete the incentives, but you also must make sure everyone else can view the list.

With Windows SharePoint Services, you can set specific permissions for a list or document library, separate from the rest of the Web site. You can remove the users who should not have access to the list and add only those who should.

For example, by default, members of the Contributor site group can view, insert, edit, and delete items in lists and document libraries. If you want only three people to have these rights on your incentives list, you can remove the Contributor site group’s permissions on that list, and simply add the three users with the appropriate rights.

When you grant users permission to a list or document library, you do so by selecting the actual permissions you want them to have. So, if you want a user to be able to view items, you click View items.

Per-list and per-document library permissions are managed from the list or document library itself. You can add or remove users for a list or document library without adding or removing them from the site as a whole.

 Note   If you do add a user to a list or document library who is not already a member of the site, the user is added to the site, but assigned to the Guest site group. This special site group is only used to grant users permissions to a specific list or document library but conveys no additional rights to the site as a whole. Members of the Guest site group can see the left and top navigation bars when they view the list or document library.

Assign list or library permissions to a user
  1. In the Quick Launch bar on the Home page of your practice site, in the Lists section, click Incentives.
  2. In the Actions list, click Modify settings and columns.
  3. On the Customize Incentives page, in the General Settings section, click Change permissions for this list.
  4. On the list toolbar, click Add Users.
  5. In the Step 1: Choose Users section, in the Users area, in the text box, type mary@contoso.com to add Mary Baker, or type the e-mail address or DOMAIN\user name of the user you previously added.
  6. In the Step 2: Choose Permissions section, under Site groups, click View, insert, edit, delete items; change list settings, and then click Next.
  7. In the Step 3: Confirm Users section, verify that the e-mail address, user name, and display name for Mary Baker (or your other user) are correct.
  8. In the Step 4: Send E-Mail section, clear the Send the following e-mail to let these users know they’ve been added check box.

 Note   Because this is a practice exercise, you do not want to send an e-mail message to your new user.

  1. Click Finish.

Although the preceding procedure steps you through assigning per-list permissions for a specific user, these same steps can be used for a document library. Just go to the document library page, click Modify settings and columns, and on the Customize <Document Library Name> page, click Change permissions for this document library, and then follow steps 4 through 9 below.

Now that Mary Baker has permissions to change the list, you need to change the permissions of the Contributor site group to prevent members from changing the list. Again, this procedure can also work for a document library.

Change list or library permissions for a site group
  1. On the Change Permissions: Incentives page, select the Contributor check box, and then click Edit Permissions of Selected Users.
  2. In the Choose Permissions section, click View items, and then click OK.

Again, this procedure can also work for a document library

When you are done with this tutorial, you should delete your practice user so that you don’t leave a fictitious user on your site. To delete a user, on the Site Settings page, click Manage Users. On the Manage Users page, select the check box next to Mary North, and then click Remove Selected Users.

You may also want to delete your practice site so that you don’t waste your server resources. To delete a site, on the Site Settings page, click Go to Site Administration. On the Site Administration page, in the Management and Statistics section, click Delete this site. On the confirmation page, click Delete.

Credit: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-sharepoint-services-help/managing-users-and-specifying-permissions-for-a-web-site-based-on-windows-sharepoint-services-technology-HA001119404.aspx

Understanding Filters in SharePoint List Views [Solved]

Understanding Filters in SharePoint List Views

The other day I had a particularly strained query I needed to configure so I set about understanding exactly what goes on when you set up filters in a view. For some reason it’s not something I’d ever really dug into before, so it was a eureka moment when I realised that I could look at the CAML of a view after I had created it.

[Obviously I knew that each view had CAML underpinning it – and I knew it was possible to get the schema for a list, including the views, through the UI – so why didn’t I do this years ago!?]

So let’s walk through an example. First I’ll knock up a task list with a few items in it:

2011-08-10-UnderstandingFilters-01.PNG

Now, presuming that I want to see items that are related to SharePoint and have a status of In Progress or Completed, I’ll create a view in the list to show items that:

Contain the word ‘SharePoint’ in the Title field
AND
Have a Status equal to ‘In Progress’
OR
Have a Status equal to ‘Completed’

I do this with the following configuration:

2011-08-10-UnderstandingFilters-02.PNG

I’m sure those familiar with list views can already see a problem with this, but actually it seems to read ok. Biased with my expectations of what I want the list to do, I’m in effect hoping for parenthesis around the last two statements in the filter I’ve setup.

But look at the results of this filter. I’m getting an entry in there which is not what I expected as it only fills half of my criteria, e.g. it has a Status of ‘Completed’ but it does not contain the word ‘SharePoint’ in the Title.

2011-08-10-UnderstandingFilters-03.PNG

Let’s inspect what’s gone wrong here. First I want to take a look at the underlying CAML associated with this view. To do that I can use the useful owssvr.dll trick in the URL to ask for an XML dump of the list schema with something like (more information here):
http://www.synergyonline.com/blog/blog-moss/Lists/Posts/Post.aspx?ID=24

http://…/site/_vti_bin/owssvr.dll?Cmd=ExportList&List={LIST GUID}

Taking a look at the generated XML I can quickly find the relevant section for my new view. There I can see the where clause of the query constructed like so:

01 <Where>
02     <Or>
03         <And>
04             <Contains>
05                 <FieldRef Name="Title"/>
06                 <Value Type="Text">SharePoint</Value>
07             </Contains>
08             <Eq>
09                 <FieldRef Name="Status"/>
10                 <Value Type="Text">In Progress</Value>
11             </Eq>
12         </And>
13         <Eq>
14             <FieldRef Name="Status"/>
15             <Value Type="Text">Completed</Value>
16         </Eq>
17     </Or>
18 </Where>

Now the problem starts to become apparent. My query will return any list items with a status of Completed. The mistake – an easy one to make – was in thinking that the query would be ‘partitioned’ on the last possible grouping in the filter. It actually works the other way around, i.e. you should always assume that the operators are taking effect between all conditions on the left of the filter and the single next condition.

We can therefore easily re-order our filters so that the Title field condition is in effect carried out on the other half of an And operator – thus giving the expected results.

2011-08-10-UnderstandingFilters-04.PNG

Given our new understanding of exactly how filters work in list views – how can we apply this? Well, I think the major thing will be to make sure that we don’t have any mistaken assumptions when setting up filters, and to try and work through the filter logic from first to last.

For those particularly difficult filters we may also want to think about viewing the query as a mathematical equation – and then seeing if we can re-arrange our equation to fit into the constraints of the logic that must be applied to filtered views.

So for example our scenario above could be thoughts of as:

A AND (B OR C)

With:
A = Title contains ‘SharePoint’
B = Status equals ‘In Progress’
C = Status equals ‘Completed’

When we put A AND B OR C into the filter of a view, we actually got (A AND B) OR C. Knowing this, we were able to restructure the query so that we entered C OR B AND A to give us (C OR B) AND A – which is actually the filter we wanted!

Credit: https://www.nothingbutsharepoint.com/sites/eusp/pages/understanding-filters-in-sharepoint-list-views.aspx

Introduction to SharePoint Lists [Solved]

Introduction to SharePoint Lists

Ways to work with lists

SharePoint LogoHere are some ways you can work with lists to help you to manage information for your group:

  • Track versions and detailed history  You can track versions of list items, so that you can see which items have changed from version to version, as well as who changed the list items. If mistakes are made in a newer version, you can restore a previous version of an item. Tracking the history of a list is especially important if your organization needs to monitor a list as it evolves.

Version history of list

  • Require approval    You can specify that approval for a list item is required before it can be viewed by everyone. Items remain in a pending state until they are approved or rejected by someone who has permission to approve them. You can control which groups of users can view a list item before it is approved.
  • Integrate e-mail with a list    If incoming or outgoing mail has been enabled on your site, lists can take advantage of e-mail features. Some lists, such as calendars, can be set up so that people can add content to them by sending e-mail. Other lists, such as a task list, can be set up to send mail to people when items are assigned to them. Your organization can customize other types of lists to receive e-mail.
  • Customize permissions    You can specify whether participants for your list can read and edit only the items they created or all items in the list. People who have permission to manage lists can read and edit all list items. You can also apply specific permission levels to a single list item, for example, if the issue contains confidential information.
  • Create and manage views    Your group can create different views of the same list. The contents of the actual list don’t change, but the items are organized or filtered so that people can find the most important or interesting information, depending on their needs.
  • Use formulas and calculated values    You can use formulas and calculated values to dynamically generate information in the columns of a list. The operations can include information from one or more other columns in a list as well as system functions such as [today] to indicate the current date. For example, you can specify a default due date that is seven days from the current date.
  • Keep informed about changes    Lists and views in Windows SharePoint Services 3.0 now use RSS, so that members of your workgroup can automatically receive updates. RSS is a technology that enables people to receive and view updates or RSS feeds of news and information in a consolidated location. You can also create e-mail alerts to notify you when the lists are changed or when new items are added. Alerts are a convenient way to keep track of the changes that are important to you.
  • Share list information with a database program    If you have a database program installed that is compatible with Windows SharePoint Services 3.0, such as Microsoft Office Access 2007, you can export and import data to and from your site, as well as link a table from the database to a SharePoint list. When you work with your list data in a database, you can analyze it as you analyze any data, such as by using queries, joins, and reports.

Use lists consistently across sites    If your group works with several types of lists, you can add consistency across multiple lists with content types, site columns, and templates. These features enable you to reuse the settings and list structure in an efficient way. For example, you can create a content type for a customer service issue that specifies certain columns (such as customer contact) and business processes for the content type. Another example is creating a site column for department names that has a drop-down list of departments. You can reuse the column in multiple lists to ensure that the names always appear the same way in each list.

Find links to more information about content types, site columns, and list templates in the See Also section.

  • Work on list items from an e-mail program    By using an e-mail program that is compatible with Windows SharePoint Services 3.0, you can take important list information with you. For example, with Microsoft Office Outlook 2007, you can view and update tasks, contacts, and discussion boards on your site from Outlook.

Credit: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-sharepoint-services-help/introduction-to-lists-HA010024274.aspx

How to Sync Project to SharePoint [SOLVED]

How to Sync Project to SharePoint

Project LogoA Project Manager (PM) can use all the advanced scheduling capabilities that exist in Project Professional with all the collaborative capabilities that exist in SharePoint.

Users can now publish a project plan from Project to SharePoint and vice versa.  Any changes made in Project / SharePoint can be easily updated into SharePoint / Project with the click of a button.

So how does this work?  Let’s assume a PM creates a simple project plan in Project Professional, as shown below.

clip_image001

The PM would like to share the plan with his/her team members via SharePoint.  To do this, the PM clicks on the File tab and drills on to Save & Send > Sync with Tasks List (see image below).  After filling out the required fields, the user clicks on Sync, and in a matter of seconds the project plan has been published to SharePoint.

image

 

The SharePoint list will look as follows:

clip_image001[6]

Now the team members can view and modify the data in SharePoint, and the PM can synchronize the updates by clicking on the Sync button.  Tip: After the first sync, the Sync button also appears in the Info tab shown below.

image

How to Sync Project to SharePoint

If the same data is modified both in SharePoint and Project, the PM will be prompted with a conflict resolution dialog next time there is a Sync operation.

image

A few important things to notice are:

· Summary tasks are supported in the synchronization

· Most custom fields can be synchronized, and can be added via the Manage Fields dialog (click on Manage Fields button shown on the image above in the Info tab)

· This feature only works with SharePoint Foundation and SharePoint Server 2010

· This feature only works when Project Professional is not connected to the server

 

Credit: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/project/archive/2009/10/19/project-2010-introducing-sync-to-sharepoint.aspx

What is Microsoft Office SharePoint Server

What is Microsoft Office SharePoint Server

SharePoint LogoMicrosoft Office SharePoint Server (MOSS) is the full version of a portal-based platform for collaboratively creating, managing and sharing documents and Web services. MOSS enables users to create “Sharepoint Portals” that include shared workspaces, applications, blogs, wikis and other documents accessible through a Web browser. The free version, Windows SharePoint Server (WSS), usually referred to as simply “Sharepoint,” is available as a free download included with every Windows Server license.

MOSS is used by many enterprises as a content management system (CMS). Partially as a result of the tight integration with Microsoft productivity applications included in Office, such as Word, many administrators have found MOSS useful in organizing and aggregating an enterprise’s data into Web-based portal with defined taxonomies that structure the information. MOSS includes additional features as an inducement for system administrators to upgrade from WSS, including knowledge management, organization of business processes and enterprise search. Both versions include support for many Firefox.

Fundamentally, MOSS provides an integrated platform for building customized Web-based applications and portals in Windows Server environments. To address the needs of remote workers and telecommuters, as well as system administrator concerns for data security, MOSS can be configured to return separate content depending on whether access is gained from intranet, extranet or Internet locations. Active Directory groups or HTML forms authentication can also be added to MOSS, granting multiple permissions to multiple parties or through alternate providers.

Users log on to Web portals to edit and create shared documents. These “SharePoint portals” are ASP.NET applications that are hosted on a server and use a SQL Server database. MOSS provides Web browser-based management and administration tools that allow users to create and edit a document or document library independently. Collaborative editing of this kind is aided by integrated access and revision controls, allowing administrators to freeze certain documents or restrict user privileges where required. MOSS also uses embeddable widgets in shared Web pages to add additional functionality. Widgets include:

  • shared workspaces and personal dashboards
  • navigation tools
  • lists
  • automatic alerts, including email and integrated RSS
  • shared calendar and contacts
  • discussion boards

Users build SharePoint pages is by combining selected widgets into a Web page. Any Web editor that supports ASP.NET can be used for this purpose, though Microsoft has released a WYSIWYG HTML editor, Microsoft Office SharePoint Designer (MOSD), that was specifically designed for this purpose.

Critics of SharePoint point out that certain features of MOSS 2007 only work with the newest version of Microsoft Office, thereby forcing IT managers to upgrade their software. SharePoint’s lack of support for non-Microsoft formats, like files saved using Quark or Adobe Acrobat (.PDF), is also a cause of concern for some administrators evaluating the suite as a potential enterprise-wide CMS.

The previous versions of SharePoint are SharePoint Portal Server 2003 and SharePoint Portal Server 2001.

Credit: http://searchwindowsserver.techtarget.com/definition/Microsoft-Office-SharePoint-Server-MOSS

The Out of The Box Features of SharePoint 2010

The Out of The Box Features of SharePoint 2010

SharePoint LogoBelow is a list of all of the “out of the box” web parts that comes with SharePoint 2010. The column on the right highlights which Site Collection Feature you have to activate to enable the web parts. Some web parts will require additional farm solutions like SQL Reporting.

Business Data

Business Data Actions – Displays a list of actions from Business Data Connectivity. SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features
Business Data Connectivity Filter – Filters the contents of Web Parts using a list of values from the Business Data Connectivity. SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features
Business Data Item – Displays one item from a data source in Business Data Connectivity. SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features
Business Data Item Builder – Creates a Business Data item from parameters in the query string and provides it to other Web Parts. SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features
Business Data List – Displays a list of items from a data source in Business Data Connectivity. SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features
Business Data Related List – Displays a list of items related to one or more parent items from a data source in Business Data Connectivity. SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features
Chart Web Part – Helps you to visualize your data using charts, pull data from another web part, SharePoint lists, Business Data Catalog, or Excel Services. SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features
Excel Web Access – Use the Excel Web Access Web Part to interact with an Excel workbook as a Web page. SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features
Indicator Details – Displays the details of a single Status Indicator. Status Indicators display an important measure for an organization and may be obtained from other data sources including SharePoint lists, Excel workbooks, and SQL Server 2005 Analysis Services KPIs. SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features
Status Lists – Shows a list of Status Indicators. Status Indicators display important measures for your organization, and show how your organization is performing with respect to your goals. SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features
Visio Web Access – Enables viewing and refreshing of Visio Web Drawings, like org charts, workflows, business processes and more. SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features

Content Rollup

Categories – Displays categories from the Site Directory, discontinued in SharePoint 2010, available for SharePoint 2007 upgrades. SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
Content Query – Rolls up data from sub sites throughout your site. Data can be queried and filtered based on content type, site columns, and specific lists and libraries. SharePoint Server Publishing Infrastructure
Relevant Documents – Displays documents that have been modified by, created by, or checked out to the current user, within the current web site (not the entire site collection). Fresh Install
RSS Viewer – Displays an RSS feed from other websites or services. SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
Site Aggregator – Displays specific information from the sites of your choice, defaults to showing documents similar to Relevant Documents. SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
Sites In Category – Displays sites from the Site Directory within a specific category, discontinued in SharePoint 2010, available for SharePoint 2007 upgrades. SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
Summary Links – Allows authors to create a custom link library that can be grouped and styled. SharePoint Server Publishing Infrastructure
Table Of Contents – Displays the navigation hierarchy of your site, subsites, lists and libraries. SharePoint Server Publishing Infrastructure
Web Analytics Web Part – Displays the most viewed content, most frequent search queries from a site, or most frequent search queries from a search center. Advanced Web Analytics
WSRP Viewer – Displays portlets from web sites using WSRP 1.1. SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features
XML Viewer – Transforms XML data using XSL and shows the results. Fresh Install

Filters

Apply Filters Button – Add this button to a page so users can decide when to apply their filter choices. Otherwise, each filter is applied when its value is changed. SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features
Choice Filter – Filters the contents of Web Parts using a list of values entered by the page author SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features
Current User Filter – Filters the contents of Web Parts by using properties of the current user SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features
Date Filter – Filter the contents of Web Parts by allowing users to enter or pick a date SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features
Page Field Filter – Filters the contents of Web Parts using information about the current page SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features
Query String (URL) Filter – Filters the contents of Web Parts using values passed via the query string SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features
SharePoint List Filter – Filters the contents of Web Parts by using a list of values SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features
SQL Server Analysis Services Filter – Filters the contents of Web Parts using a list of values from SQL Server Analysis Services cubes SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features
Text Filter – Filters the contents of Web Parts by allowing users to enter a text value SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features

Forms

HTML Form Web Part – Connects simple form controls to other Web Parts Fresh Install
InfoPath Form Web Part – Use this Web Part to display an InfoPath browser-enabled form SharePoint Server Enterprise Site Collection features

Media and Content

Content Editor – Allows authors to enter rich media content like formatted text, images, and other custom HTML. Fresh Install
Image Viewer – Displays a specified image. Fresh Install
Media Web Part – Use to embed media clips (video and audio) in a web page, links directly to a video file, not a video service like YouTube.com. SharePoint Server Publishing Infrastructure
Page Viewer – Displays another Web page on this Web page inside of a window. Fresh Install
Picture Library Slideshow Web Part – Use to display a slideshow of images and photos from a picture library Fresh Install
Silverlight Web Part – A web part to display a Silverlight application Fresh Install

Outlook Web App

My Calendar – Displays your calendar using Outlook Web Access for Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 or later SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
My Contacts – Displays your contacts using Outlook Web Access for Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 or later SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
My Inbox – Displays your inbox using Outlook Web Access for Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 or later SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
My Mail Folder – Displays your mail folder using Outlook Web Access for Microsoft Exchange Server 2000 SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
My Tasks – Displays your tasks using Outlook Web Access for Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 or later SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features

PerformancePoint

PerformancePoint Filter – This web part displays PerformancePoint filters. Filters may be linked to other web parts to provide an interactive dashboard experience. Filter types include lists and trees based on a variety of data sources PerformancePoint Services Site Collection Features
PerformancePoint Report – This web part displays PerformancePoint reports. Reports may be linked to other web parts to create an interactive dashboard experience. Report types include: Analytic charts & grids, Strategy Maps, Excel Services, Reporting Services, Predictive Trend charts, and web pages PerformancePoint Services Site Collection Features
PerformancePoint Scorecard – This web part displays a PerformancePoint scorecard. Scorecards may be linked to other web parts, such as filters and reports, to create an interactive dashboard experience. PerformancePoint Services Site Collection Features
PerformancePoint Stack Selector – This web part displays a PerformancePoint Stack Selector. All PerformancePoint web parts, such as filters and reports, contained in the same zone will be automatically stacked and selectable using this web part. PerformancePoint Services Site Collection Features

Search

Advanced Search Box – Displays parameterized search options based on properties and combinations of words. SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
Dual Chinese Search – Used to search Dual Chinese document and items at the same time. SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
Federated Results – Displays search results from a configured location SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
People Refinement Panel – This webpart helps the users to refine people search results SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
People Search Box – Presents a search box that allows users to search for people SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
People Search Core Results – Displays the people search results and the properties associated with them. SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
Refinement Panel – This webpart helps the users to refine search results SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
Related Queries – This webpart displays related queries to a user query SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
Search Action Link – Displays the search action links on the search results page SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
Search Best Bets – Displays high-confidence results on a search results page. SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
Search Box – Displays a search box that allows users to search for information. SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
Search Core Results – Displays the search results and the properties associated with them SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
Search Paging – Display links for navigating pages containing search results. SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
Search Statistics – Displays the search statistics such as the number of results shown on the current page, total number of results and time taken to perform the search. SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
Search Summary – Displays suggestions for current search query SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
Search Visual Best Bet – Displays Visual Best Bet SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
Top Federated Results – Displays the Top Federated result from the configured location SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features

Social Collaboration

Contact Details – Displays details and image for a single contact. SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
Note Board – Enable users to leave short, publicly-viewable notes about this page. SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
Organization Browser – This Web Part displays each person in the reporting chain in an interactive view optimized for browsing organization charts. Additional information has to be managed in Active Directory. SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
Site Users – Use the Site Users Web Part to see a list of users and groups who have access to the current site, or list users from a selected group. Fresh Install
Tag Cloud – Displays the most popular subjects being tagged inside your organization SharePoint Server Standard Site Collection features
User Tasks – Displays tasks that are assigned to the current user within the site, does not include all tasks in site collection. Fresh Install

SQL Server Reporting

SQL Server Reporting Services Report Viewer – Use the Report Viewer to view SQL Server Reporting Services reports. Report Server Integration Feature

Credit: http://sp365.co.uk/2012/03/sharepoint-2010-web-parts-and-their-features/

Microsoft SharePoint 2007 For Dummies [SOLVED]

Microsoft SharePoint 2007 For Dummies [SOLVED]

Microsoft SharePoint lets you share information across platforms and users and it helps to know what all the pieces of Sharepoint can do. You may want to look at SharePoint’s administration model or its site hierarchy, as well.

SharePoint’s Feature Areas by Product Type: WSS/MOSS

Microsoft Office SharePoint Server (MOSS) 2007 is officially part of the Microsoft Office suite of products, which gives you access to Windows SharePoint Services (WSS). The first table lays out the WSS and MOSS templates.

Microsoft SharePoint 2007 For Dummies [SOLVED]

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The table here shows SharePoint’s major features.

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How to Access SharePoint from a Client

When you’re working for a client using Microsoft SharePoint, you may have to use their browser or other access tool. This table shows you how to get to where you want to go from a variety of points:

Client Integration URL Access http://server UNC Access //server/ Custom Applications
Word 2003/2007 Browsers — IE, Firefox, Safari Windows Explorer Object model
Excel 2003/2007 Office 2007 clients Mapped drive letter (net use command) Web Services
Outlook 2003/2007 Office 2003 clients
Access 2003/2007 Other Windows applications
PowerPoint 2007 My Network Places
InfoPath 2007

SharePoint 2007’s Administration Model

Microsoft SharePoint 2007 uses an administration model — a family of technologies that provides a server infrastructure to support the needs of information workers and their employers. The configuration of the administration model looks like this:

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SharePoint’s Site Hierarchy Model

All of Microsoft SharePoint’s features are delivered via a hierarchy of Web sites. This sample SharePoint hierarchy begins at folders and moves up the chain to the server farm.

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Microsoft SharePoint 2007 For Dummies

Source: http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/microsoft-sharepoint-2007-for-dummies-cheat-sheet.html