How to Insert Hyperlinks into Word [Solved]

How to Insert Hyperlinks into Word

Word 2010 LogoHyperlinks are links that you include in your document that allow you to quickly jump to another location by clicking the hyperlinked word or image. Hyperlinks can link to places within the document, places in other documents, email addresses or web pages.  In addition to hyperlinks, Word 2010 has a special kind of link, known as a cross-reference, which allows you to link to numbered item, heading, bookmark, footnote/endnote, equation, figure or table.

  1. Open the document you would like to add the hyperlinks to. Select the text you would like to link.
  2. On the Insert tab, click Hyperlink in the Links group.
  3. In the Insert Hyperlink dialog box, you have a number of hyperlink options.  In the left pane, select what type of location you would like to link to.
    1. Existing File or Web Page: select the location from one of the items listed.  Or enter in the location in the Address field – this is typically used for websites or network addresses.
      Existing File or Web Page
    2. Place in this Document: select from any of the headings or bookmarks within the document.  If all the items are not displayed, click the plus symbol to expand the category.
      Place in this Document
    3. Create New Document: enter the name for the new document and selectChange to enter in the location where the new document should be saved.
      Create New Document
    4. E-mail Address: enter an email address that should automatically be entered into a new email form.  You may also choose to add a subject line, which will also be included in the email message.”

      NOTE: this will use whichever application is set up as the default email software on your computer.  When clicking on this hyperlink, you may be prompted to confirm that you would like to open your email program.

      E-mail Address

  4. Once you have selected your hyperlink option, click OK.
  5. You will see that your hyperlinked text now appears in colour and underlined.  To test the hyperlink, hover your mouse over the text to see the ScreenTip appear.
    Screen Tip
  6. Hold Ctrl and click the hyperlinked text.  Your selected location will open.
  7. If you no longer want the texted to link to anything, right-click the hyperlink and selectRemove Hyperlink.
    Remove Hyperlink
  8. The hyperlink will be removed and the text will no longer appear in colour or underlined.

That’s it for inserting hyperlinks.  Hope you found it useful – don’t forget to take a look at some of the other tutorials about working in Word 2010.

 

Credit: http://pcunleashed.com/word/how-to-insert-hyperlinks-in-word/

How to Mark Word Document as Final [Solved]

How to Mark Word Document as Final

Word 2010 LogoYou can mark a final version of a document as Final to protect it from unintentional changes to the content.

To mark a document as Final

  1. Click the Office button
  2. Point to Prepare.
  3. Click Mark as Final.

This feature disables all the tabs in the Ribbon. Typing in the document is disabled as well.

Mark as Final is not a strong security feature to protect a document, as the restriction can be removed easily by clicking again on Mark as Final.

untitled

2)     Make a document read-only (soft protection)

You can make a document read-only to prevent accidental modification of the content.

To make a document read-only

  1. Right-click the document. The Properties dialog box appears.
  2. In the dialog box, under the tab General, click the check box Read-only.

OR

You can double-click the document by holding the ALT key to the open the Properties dialog box.

Now, if you open the document, you can view Read-only marked along with the document name in the title bar. All the tabs in the Ribbon are disabled.

Again, this is not a strong security feature, as anyone can remove restrictions by deselecting the Read-only check box from the right-click menu.

untitled

3)     Protect Document (strong protection)

The Protect Document feature available under the Developer tab enables you to hard protect a document.

To protect a document

  1. Under the tab Developer, within the group Protect, click Protect Document.
  2. From the drop-down menu, click Restrict Formatting and Editing. The Restrict Formatting and Editing task pane appears on the right hand side.

Note: In case, the Developer tab is not available in the Ribbon, you can enable it from Word Options. Click the Office button. From the bottom of the menu, click the Word Options button. The Word Options dialog box appears. Click Popular from the menu list on the left. On the right hand pane, click the check box Show Developer Tab in the Ribbon.

  1. Now in the Restrict Formatting and Editing task pane, under the section Editing Restriction, select the check box Allow only this type of editing in the document and the restriction type drop down gets enabled. Select the option No changes (Read only) option.
  2. Click the button Yes, Start Enforcing Protection. Start Enforcing Protection dialog box appears.
  3. Under the options Password, enter a new password to protect the document. One will have to provide this password to modify the document.

This does not ensure full proof protection as the document is not encrypted.

Untitled 1

4)     Encrypt a Document (full proof protection of a document)

The Encrypt Document option provides full proof protection to a document.

To encrypt a document

  1. Click the Office button
  2. Point to Prepare in the drop-down list
  3. Click Encrypt Document. The encrypt document dialog box appears.
  4. Enter a password in the Password field. Click OK.
  5. Reenter the password. Click OK.

Remember the password, as there is no way to recover a document if you forget the password.

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Credit: https://wordknowhow.wordpress.com/tag/mark-a-document-final/

How to Create Watermarks with Microsoft Word [Solved]

How to Create Watermarks with Microsoft Word

Word 2010 LogoRecently, I sent a draft article to a friend for review. Although I expected to get a call to discuss the article, I didn’t expect we would discuss how I made the document. Specifically, he wanted to know how I created the background text or draft watermark in Microsoft Word. (Includes online tutorial.)

Like many people, if I send a Microsoft Word document which is confidential or a draft, I like to include a watermark. The process is easy but varies based on which version of Microsoft Word you use. Microsoft Word 2007 is the easiest to use for this task.

Regardless of which version of Microsoft Word you’re using, the watermarks won’t show in Normal view. You need to be in Print Layout view to see them.

To create a watermark using Word 2007

1. From the Office ribbon, click Page Layout.

2. In the Page Background group, click Watermark. A dialog will appear with images of common watermarks such as “Draft”, “Urgent”, “Confidential” and so on.

3. Click the watermark you’d like to use.

Your watermark will now appear on every page.

To create a watermark using Word 2002 & 2003

1. From the Format menu, select Background and then Printed Watermark

2. In the Printed Watermark dialog, select the radio button for Text watermark.

3. In the Text field, either type your value or select from the predefined list.

4. Select any other options and click the OK button.

To add a watermark or background text in Word 2000

In my friend’s case, he was using Microsoft Word 2000, which takes more steps. While there are a couple of ways to do this task, I prefer including the watermark in the header. This tends to confuse some people as they think the header is restricted to the top of the document.

1. From the View menu, click Header and Footer. The Header and Footer toolbar and placeholder area appear.

2. From the Insert menu, select Picture and then WordArt. The WordArt Gallery appears with a style grid.

3. Click the style you would like to use. I prefer the top left style.

4. Click OK.

5. In the Edit WordArt Text dialog, type your watermark text. You may also select a different font and size.

6. Click OK. Your watermark should appear on the screen along with the WordArt toolbar. The watermark does not have to be in the Header placeholder.

Note: Because the watermark is an object, you can click and reposition it anywhere on the page. You may also use the WordArt toolbar Free Rotate button to rotate the watermark or the Format WordArt button to adjust the colors and transparency.

7. Once you have tweaked your watermark, close the WordArt and Header and Footer toolbars.

8. Create you document. You’ll notice the watermark appears underneath your text.

If you need to edit the watermark, go back to step 1 and click the watermark. You may also need to go to View | Toolbars and select the WordArt toolbar.

You can see a sample of a semi-transparent Draft watermark I use which is rotated and use 40% gray.

Draft watermark example in Microsoft Word

Watermarks can be a valuable asset to any Microsoft Word document. They help convey the status of a document such as the “Draft” watermark or the importance of the data in the case of a “Confidential” watermark. With a little tweaking you can use this Word tool to create text or image watermarks.

Credit: http://www.timeatlas.com/5_minute_tips/general/creating_watermarks_with_microsoft_word#.U7WYa7FiL3w

How to Create a Custom Word Table Style for Instant Formatting [Solved]

How to Create a Custom Word Table Style for Instant Formatting

Word 2010 LogoWord’s Table AutoFormat feature offers an assortment of prefab styles you can use to jazz up your tables. But those styles may not necessarily match your document design or serve your table’s purpose. Luckily, you can specify your own set of attributes and save them as a user-defined style. Then, you can just apply the style to a table whenever you want to use your custom formatting.

Note: This information is also available as a PDF download.

To demonstrate, let’s say you generate a weekly dashboard report whose data is contained in a nice-looking, easily interpreted Word table… but manually formatting the table is getting a little old. Time to build a custom style:

  1. Choose Table AutoFormat from the Table menu (or click AutoFormat on the Tables And Borders toolbar).
  2. In the Table AutoFormat dialog box, click New (Figure A).

Figure A

table autoformat

  1. Enter a name for the style (e.g., Dashboard) and choose the style you want to base your new style on (Figure B). We’re going to base our sample style on the basic Table Grid style, but you can start off with something fancier if you prefer. Or choose Table Normal, which is unformatted, if you want to start with a blank slate.

Figure B

new style

  1. Now you can use the various tools in the New Style dialog box to specify the desired formatting. Just choose the table component you want to format from the Apply To drop-down list (Figure C) and make your selections. For this example, we specified 11-point Arial for the entire table, 14-point bold formatting and a light yellow fill for the heading row, a 1.5-point blue outside border, a 1-point yellow inside border, light blue fill for odd rows and light yellow fill for even rows (Figure D). (You’ll notice that some of the formatting — such as the font — doesn’t display in the preview.)

Figure C

style formatting

Figure D

autoformatting

  1. Click the Format button to access additional options governing the appearance of table elements and table text (Figure E). In this case, we selected Paragraph and specified 6 points of space above and below each paragraph. Not all options are available to include in your table style. For instance, you can’t set Preferred Width or Text Wrapping in the Table Properties dialog.

Figure E

additional formats

  1. If you want the style to be available to other documents based on the current template, click Add To Template. Otherwise, the style will belong to the current document only. Click OK to return to the Table AutoFormat dialog box.
  2. If you’d like this table style to be the default for all new tables you create, click Default in the Table AutoFormat dialog box. Word will let you choose between setting the default for the current document or for all documents that use the current template (Figure F). Make your selection and click OK. If you don’t want to set a default, skip this step and simply close out of the Table AutoFormat dialog box.

Figure F

template selection

The payoff

To apply the style, click in a table and open the Table AutoFormat dialog box. Choose User-Defined Table Styles from the Category drop-down list box to display your custom style(s) (Figure G). Now, just select the style and click Apply.

Figure G

applying table style

Credit: http://www.techrepublic.com/blog/microsoft-office/create-a-custom-word-table-style-for-instant-formatting/

How to Create Mail Merge Email Messages in Word [Solved]

How to Create Mail Merge Email Messages in Word

Word 2010 LogoWord 2013 lets you spew out custom email messages by using the E-Mail option for mail merge. This option works only when you configure the Microsoft Outlook program on your computer. After that’s done, you start the main document for your e-mail merge by obeying these steps:

1. Press Ctrl+N to create a fresh document.

Choose any of the Blank document template and a blank document will appear.

2. On the Mailings tab, choose Start Mail Merge→E-Mail Messages.

Word changes to web Layout view, used for creating Internet documents in Word.

3. Create your mail message. If you anticipate inserting fields in the message, type them in ALL CAPS.

Normally, an e-mail mail merge doesn’t have fields in the document, though there’s no rule against using them. Still, putting someone’s name or other personal information in the message removes the stigma of a mass e-mail form letter.

Don’t forget to save your document!

The primary field you use when merging an e-mail document is the recipient’s e-mail address. You can’t e-mail-merge without it.

Credit: http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/how-to-create-mail-merge-email-messages-in-word-20.html

How to Add Watermarks to Your Word Document [Solved]

How to Add Watermarks to Your Word Document

A watermark can be a valuable addition to your Word document – whether you want toWord 2010 Logo enhance the appearance of the document by adding a seal or image or whether you want to add a text watermark that identifies the document contents as a draft or confidential information, the watermark feature in Word is a definite asset for intermediate to advanced users of Word.

Part One: Adding a Text Watermark

To add a watermark to your document, you must display your document in either Print Layout or Normal View.

1. From the Format menu, select Background and then Printed Watermark

2. In the Printed Watermark dialog box, click the radio button beside Text Watermark

3. In the Text drop-down box, select the text you would like to use for the watermark

4. You can use the Font, Size, and Color drop-down boxes to specify font formatting for the watermark text

5. Make sure the box next to Semitransparent is checked so that the watermark text doesn’t interfere with the document text

6. You can change the orientation of the text by selecting either Diagonal or Horizontal beside the Layout label

7. Once you have selected your watermark text and applied the formatting options, click OK

The watermark will be applied to your document; you should be able to see it on the screen and when you print the document.

Credit: http://wordprocessing.about.com/od/wordprocessingsoftware/l/blwatermark.htm

How to Use Word Mail Merge for Email [Solved]

How to Use Word Mail Merge for Email

Word 2010 LogoIf you want to send a document to many people via email, but you want it to be personalized (such as ensuring each person is addressed individually), use Word for an email merge. In other words, each message you send out has the same information but certain parts of the message are unique.

An example of this might be a yearly yoga retreat that’s coming up: You’re responsible for sending out the invitation to each person who attended last year’s event—all 170 of them. Word makes it fairly simple to send out this invitation to every one of your contortionist cohorts, each of them getting an email message addressed and personalized, just to—and for—them.

In a nutshell, these are the basic steps.

Email mail merge 4-step process: Open/create, select recipients, add placeholders, preview and merge

 Important    Be sure you’re using the same versions Outlook and Word: Microsoft Word 2013 and Microsoft Outlook 2013.

The mail merge process entails the following overall steps, and while this may seem complicated, it truly can be very straightforward with a little bit of setting up.

  1. Set up the email message. In this step, you’re going to open up Word to either a blank document or one you’ve already created and get started on the merging part of the process.
  2. Connect the message to your address list. Your address list is the data source that Word will use in the mail merge. It’s a file that contains the email addresses where the messages will be sent.
  3. Add placeholders, called mail merge fields, to the email message document. When you perform the mail merge, the mail merge fields are filled with information from your address list.
  4. Preview and complete the merge. You can preview each message before you send the whole set.

Set up the email message main document

  1. Start Word and either create your message in the blank document or start Word and open up something you’ve already started.
  2. Click Mailings > Start Mail Merge > Email Messages.

Start Mail Merge command

Connect the email message document to your list

Now it’s time to choose your recipients from a data source (a fancy name for an address list). If you don’t already have a data source, you can create one during the mail merge process. Be sure to check that your data source has a column for email addresses and that you have the email address of each person you’re sending this to.

Click Mailings > Select Recipients, and choose the data source you want to use:

  • To use the email addresses from your Outlook contacts, click Choose from Outlook Contacts. If Word prompts you to choose a contact list or and Outlook profile, click the list or profile you want to use in the merge.

Outlook contacts command

 Important    Be sure to make any changes to your contact list in Outlook before you start the merge. You won’t be able to change the list in Word.

  • To use an address list that’s in an Excel spreadsheet or an Access database, click Use an Existing List and then browse to your list.

Select Recipients command

(You can read more about how to run a mail merge using an Excel spreadsheet.)

  • If you don’t have an address list yet, click Type a New List and fill in the form that Word opens. (The list you create is saved as a database file, or.mdb file, that you can reuse. Read more about how to set up a mail merge list in Word.)

Type a New List command

 Note    The next time you want to use this list for a merge, click Mailings > Select Recipients > Use an Existing List and choose the list you made.

If you clicked Use an Existing List, Word automatically selects everyone on the list you chose. If you plan to use your entire list as is, you can skip to the next step.

To narrow the list of recipients, select the names you want in the Mail Merge Recipients box. (You can open the Mail Merge Recipients box by clicking Mailings > Edit Recipient List.)

Here are some ways to narrow your list:

  • Select individual records    This is most useful if your list is short. Check the boxes next to the people you want to include, and uncheck the boxes next to the people you don’t.

Select rows by checking the check box

  • Sort records    Click the column heading of the item that you want to sort by. The list sorts in ascending alphabetical order (from A to Z). Click the column heading again to sort the list in descending alphabetical order (Z to A).

The Sort command

  • Filter records    Under Refine recipient list, click Filter. This is handy when the list contains things that you know you don’t want to see or include in the merge. After you filter the list, you can check or uncheck the boxes to include or exclude people.

The Filter command

For more details on filtering, see Sort and filter the data for a mail merge.

  • Add recipients    To add people to the list, under Data source, click the name of your data file. Click Edit > New Entry and type the information for that recipient. For more information, see Add to a mail merge address list.

Add placeholders—or fields—to the email message document

After you connect your document to your address list, type the text of the message.

To personalize each message, add mail merge fields from your data source. For example, click Mailings > Write & Insert Fields > Greeting Line to add a line with the person’s name.

Greeting Line mail merge field button

The Insert Greeting Line box opens, and you can choose whether you want to add “Dear” or “To” and how you want the person’s name to appear. Word inserts a placeholder for the greeting line and then adds each name during the merge.

You can also add other fields from your data source by clicking Insert Merge Field and the field you want to add. For more information, see Insert mail merge fields.

Insert Merge Field menu of available fields

Formatting

A spreadsheet program such as Excel stores the information that you type inside cells as raw data. When you merge information from an Excel spreadsheet into a Word document, you are merging that raw data without any Excel formatting. If your spreadsheet includes dates, times, currency values, or postal codes that begin or end in 0, read about formatting mail merge numbers, dates, and other values.

Preview and finish the merge

After you add fields to your email message’s main document, you’re ready to preview the merge results. When you’re satisfied with the preview, you can complete the merge.

Preview the merge

Click Mailings, and a couple of groups to the right, you’ll see Preview Results.

Preview Results group

Now you can do any or all of the following:

  • Click Preview Results.(This option is available only if you chose one or more placeholder fields, such as greeting, name, address, etc.)
  • Page through each email message by clicking the blue arrows.
  • Preview a specific document by clicking Find Recipient.
  • Edit your recipient list—who’s getting this message—by clicking Mailings > Edit Recipient List.

Complete the merge and send the messages

  1. Click Mailings > Finish & Merge > Send E-mail Messages.
  2. In the To box, select the name of the email address column in your list.

 Note    Word sends an individual message to each email address. You can’t Cc or Bcc other recipients. You also can’t add attachments to the email merge message.

  1. In the Subject line box, type a subject line for the message.
  2. In the Mail format box, click HTML or Plain text to send the document as the body of the email message.

 Important   If you send the document as a plain text email message, the email message won’t include any text formatting or graphics.

Save the message

Save the message if you plan to use it for another mail merge.

When you save the email message’s main document, you also save its connection to the data file you chose. The next time you open the email message main document, Word prompts you to choose whether to keep the connection to the data file.

  • If you click Yes, the document opens with information from the first record merged in.
  • If you click No, the connection between the email message main document and the data file is broken. The email message main document becomes a standard Word document.

Credit: http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/word-help/use-word-mail-merge-for-email-HA102809788.aspx

How to Create Watermarks using Microsoft Word

How to Create Watermarks using Microsoft Word

Word 2010 LogoRecently, I sent a draft article to a friend for review. Although I expected to get a call to discuss the article, I didn’t expect we would discuss how I made the document. Specifically, he wanted to know how I created the background text or draft watermark in Microsoft Word. (Includes online tutorial.)

Like many people, if I send a Microsoft Word document which is confidential or a draft, I like to include a watermark. The process is easy but varies based on which version of Microsoft Word you use. Microsoft Word 2007 is the easiest to use for this task.

Regardless of which version of Microsoft Word you’re using, the watermarks won’t show in Normal view. You need to be in Print Layout view to see them.

To create a watermark using Word 2007

1. From the Office ribbon, click Page Layout.

2. In the Page Background group, click Watermark. A dialog will appear with images of common watermarks such as “Draft”, “Urgent”, “Confidential” and so on.

3. Click the watermark you’d like to use.

Your watermark will now appear on every page.

To create a watermark using Word 2002 & 2003

1. From the Format menu, select Background and then Printed Watermark

2. In the Printed Watermark dialog, select the radio button for Text watermark.

3. In the Text field, either type your value or select from the predefined list.

4. Select any other options and click the OK button.

To add a watermark or background text in Word 2000

In my friend’s case, he was using Microsoft Word 2000, which takes more steps. While there are a couple of ways to do this task, I prefer including the watermark in the header. This tends to confuse some people as they think the header is restricted to the top of the document.

1. From the View menu, click Header and Footer. The Header and Footer toolbar and placeholder area appear.

2. From the Insert menu, select Picture and then WordArt. The WordArt Gallery appears with a style grid.

3. Click the style you would like to use. I prefer the top left style.

4. Click OK.

5. In the Edit WordArt Text dialog, type your watermark text. You may also select a different font and size.

6. Click OK. Your watermark should appear on the screen along with the WordArt toolbar. The watermark does not have to be in the Header placeholder.

Note: Because the watermark is an object, you can click and reposition it anywhere on the page. You may also use the WordArt toolbar Free Rotate button to rotate the watermark or the Format WordArt button to adjust the colors and transparency.

7. Once you have tweaked your watermark, close the WordArt and Header and Footer toolbars.

8. Create you document. You’ll notice the watermark appears underneath your text.

If you need to edit the watermark, go back to step 1 and click the watermark. You may also need to go to View | Toolbars and select the WordArt toolbar.

You can see a sample of a semi-transparent Draft watermark I use which is rotated and use 40% gray.

Draft watermark example in Microsoft Word

Watermarks can be a valuable asset to any Microsoft Word document. They help convey the status of a document such as the “Draft” watermark or the importance of the data in the case of a “Confidential” watermark. With a little tweaking you can use this Word tool to create text or image watermarks.

Credit: http://www.timeatlas.com/5_minute_tips/general/creating_watermarks_with_microsoft_word#.U4anhChiL3w

Mail Merge with leading zero’s (0’s) [Solved]

Mail Merge with leading zero’s (0’s) [Solved]

 

Word 2007 and Word 2010

  1. In Excel, select the column that contains the ZIP Code/Postal Code field.
  2. On the Home tab, go to the Cells group. Then, click Format, and then click Format Cells.
  3. Click the Number tab.
  4. Under Category, click Text, and then click OK.
  5. Save the data source. Then, continue with the mail merge operation in Word.

Word 2002 and Word 2003

  1. In Excel, select the column that contains the ZIP Code/Postal Code field.
  2. On the Format menu, click Cells.
  3. Click the Number tab.
  4. Under Category, click Text, and then click OK.
  5. Save the data source. Then, continue with the mail merge operation in Word.

Mail Merge with leading zero’s (0’s) [Solved]

How to Apply Mail Merge

How to Apply Mail Merge

When you are performing a Mail Merge, you will need a Word document (you caWord 2010 Logon start with an existing one or create a new one) and a recipient list, which is typically an Excel workbook. If you’d like to work along with the lesson, you can download the examples below.

To use Mail Merge:

  1. Open an existing Word document, or create a new one.
  2. Click the Mailings tab.
  3. Click the Start Mail Merge command.
  4. Select Step by Step Mail Merge Wizard.
    Selecting Step by Step Mail Merge Wizard

The Mail Merge task pane appears and will guide you through the six main steps to complete a merge. The following is an example of how to create a form letter and merge the letter with a recipient list.

Step 1:

  1. Choose the type of document you wish to create. In this example, select Letters.
    Selecting a document
  2. Click Next: Starting document to move to Step 2.

Step 2:

  1. Select Use the current document.
    Selecting a starting document
  2. Click Next: Select recipients to move to Step 3.

Step 3:

Now you’ll need an address list so Word can automatically place each address into the document. The list can be in an existing file, such as an Excel workbook, or you can type a new address list from within the Mail Merge Wizard.

  1. From the Mail Merge task pane, select Use an existing list, then click Browse.
    Browsing for a data source
  2. Locate your file in the dialog box (you may have to navigate to a different folder), then click Open.
    Choosing a file
  3. If the address list is in an Excel workbook, select the worksheet that contains the list, then click OK.
    Selecting a table
  4. In the Mail Merge Recipients dialog box, you can check or uncheck each recipient to control which ones are used in the merge. When you’re done, click OK to close the dialog box.
    Use check boxes to include or exclude recipients
  5. From the Mail Merge task pane, click Next: Write your letter to move to Step 4.

If you don’t have an existing address list, you can click the Type a new list button and click Create. You can then type your address list.

Step 4:

Now you’re ready to write your letter. When it’s printed, each copy of the letter will basically be the same, except the recipient data (such as the name and address) will be different on each one. You’ll need to add placeholders for the recipient data so Mail Merge knows exactly where to add the data. If you’re using Mail Merge with an existing letter, make sure the file is open.

To insert recipient data:

  1. Place the insertion point in the document where you wish the information to appear.
  2. Select Address block, Greeting line, Electronic postage, or More items from the task pane.
    Inserting an address block
  3. Depending on your selection, a dialog box may appear with various options. Select the desired options, then click OK.
    Adjusting the address block formatting
  4. A placeholder appears in your document. For example: «AddressBlock».
  5. Repeat these steps each time you need to enter information from your data record.
  6. From the Mail Merge task pane, click Next: Preview your letters to move to Step 5.

For some letters, you’ll only need to add an Address block and Greeting line. Sometimes, however, you may wish to place recipient data within the body of the letter to personalize it even further.

Step 5:

  1. Preview the letters to make sure information from the recipient list appears correctly in the letter. You can use the left and right scroll arrows to view each document.
    Previewing the letters
  2. Click Next: Complete the merge to move to Step 6.

Step 6:

  1. Click Print to print the letters.
    Printing the letters
  2. The Merge to Printer dialog box opens. Click All, then click OK.
    The Merge to Printer dialog box
  3. The Print dialog box will appear. Adjust the print settings if needed, then click OK.
    The Print dialog box

Challenge!

  1. Open an existing Word document. If you want, you can use this example.
  2. Download this recipient list.
  3. Use the Mail Merge Wizard to merge the letter with the recipient list.
  4. Place an Address Block at the top of the page and a Greeting line above the body of the letter.
  5. Print the document.

 

Credit: http://www.gcflearnfree.org/word2010/24.2